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Blooming into Better Health this Spring

Blooming into Better Health this Spring

Leading a Healthier Lifestyle this Spring

With the spring in full swing, what better time than now to blossom into better health by introducing positive lifestyle changes into your routine? The health experts at Campbell County Health are here to give you and your family some tips to make this your healthiest spring yet!

Get Up & Get Active

When it comes to leading an active lifestyle, it is recommended that you try to work at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity into your weekly routine. While this may sound like a lot, that’s just 30 minutes of activity a day for 5 days out of the week.

Fortunately, there are plenty of spring-focused activities that can help you and your whole family work toward your activity goals this spring!

Spring Outdoor Activities

With warmer weather and more hours of sunlight, there is more of an opportunity to take advantage of the great outdoors! Try some of these fun, family-friendly spring activities to get your heart pumping:

  • Basketball
  • Bike riding
  • Bird watching
  • Catching butterflies
  • Flying kites
  • Gardening
  • Go to a playground
  • Hiking
  • Nature walking
  • Nature scavenger hunt
  • Outdoor yoga
  • Rock collecting

Indoor Activities

While spring is in full swing, that doesn’t mean that Wyomingites have escaped gloomy weather. In the event that there are cooler temperatures or promises of rain, here are some indoor spring activities that are just as fun:

  • Aerobics classes
  • Swimming in an indoor pool
  • Water walking
  • Using gym equipment
  • Walking or jogging on an indoor track
  • Yoga classes

Preventing Viral Illnesses

While environmental allergens like pollen and mold can cause sniffles during the spring and summer months, so can common respiratory infections. Although wearing masks and practicing proper social distancing protocol may help you to avoid getting sick with COVID-19, you’re still able to get less severe infections.

Common Springtime Illnesses

The Common Cold

The common cold is a respiratory infection that can be caused by several different viruses, with rhinoviruses being the most common. When coming down with a cold, it can last from 7 to 10 days. Most people recover without any serious complications.

The Flu

The seasonal flu is another respiratory illness that is caused by influenza viruses. If an individual becomes sick with the flu, it can affect various areas of your respiratory tract, such as your nose, throat, and lungs.

While the flu is more common during the fall and winter months, it’s possible to get sick with the flu during any time of year.

COVID-19

COVID-19 is a new disease that is different from other coronaviruses that cause mild illnesses like the common cold. Symptoms can range in severity, with most cases being mild, but it can become life-threatening in some instances.

Preventing the Spread of Germs & Bacteria

When it comes to staying healthy during the springtime, it’s important to do what you can to prevent the spread of illness-causing germs and bacteria. Follow these tips to help keep you, your family, and your community safe this spring:

 
  • Wash your hands properly and often.

  • Use alcohol-based sanitizers when soap and water aren’t available.

  • Practice social distancing in public settings.

  • Continue wearing your mask in public.

  • Disinfect communal surfaces regularly.

  • Stay home if you aren’t feeling well.

Stay Up-to-Date on Vaccines

Although there is an emphasis on getting all your shots and immunizations during your childhood and adolescent years, vaccines help to protect adults. Read on to learn more about which shots are right for you throughout the stages of adulthood.

Vaccines Recommended for Children and Teens

When it comes to young children and teens, it is important to follow the vaccine schedule as outlined by your primary care doctor. Some of the recommended vaccines for children from age 0-18 include:

  • Chickenpox (varicella) vaccine
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine (DTaP)
  • Hepatitis A vaccine (HepA)
  • Hepatitis B vaccine (HepB)
  • Haemophilus influenzae B (Hib) vaccine
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR)
  • Meningococcal vaccines
  • Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV)
  • Polio vaccine (IPV)
  • Rotavirus vaccine

Vaccines Recommended for Young Adults

For young adults between the ages of 19and 26, it is recommended that you get the Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. This vaccine helps to protect the body from most cervical cancers, anal cancer, and genital warts.

While many people get this vaccine during their preteen years, it’s still possible for unvaccinated adults to get vaccinated until the age of 26. If you haven’t been vaccinated, talk with your primary care physician about the benefits and effectiveness of getting vaccinated during adulthood.

Vaccines Recommended for Adults Over 50

With age, it’s normal to experience a decline in your immune function. Unfortunately, this leaves you more likely to get sick with certain diseases. However, some of these diseases are vaccine-preventable.

The following vaccines are recommended for adults over the age of 50:

  • Shingles vaccine
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13)

If you’re not sure which vaccines are right for you and your age group, be sure to speak with your primary care physician to ensure that you’re up-to-date and on schedule with your immunizations.

CCH is open, safe and ready to see you.

With almost 80 physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners in nearly 20 specialties, CCH is committed to your wellbeing right here at home. If you have been putting off a visit to your doctor for a regular checkup, contact them; they can help weigh your personal healthcare risk and avoid further delayed diagnoses.

Visit www.cchwyo.org/findadoc to find your provider or clinic.