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Heart Attack Symptoms in Men and Women

Heart Attack Symptoms in Men and Women

Warning Signs of a Heart Attack

In the United States, someone dies of a heart attack every 40 seconds—with such shockingly high statistics, it is essential to know the warning signs of this cardiac event. Although there are some universal symptoms of having a heart attack, there are some that are gender-specific.

Universal Symptoms

About 20% of heart attacks are silent, meaning that the damage to the heart has been done, but the affected person doesn’t even know they’ve had a heart attack. This makes it increasingly important for people to understand the tell-tale signs of this cardiac event so that they can seek the appropriate medical attention to minimize the damage and prevent future heart attacks from happening.

The most commonly reported signs and symptoms associated with a heart attack include;

  • Chest tightness
  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Cold sweat
  • Lightheadedness

Symptoms in Women

While the previously mentioned heart attack symptoms can also affect women, a few symptoms of a heart attack are specific to women. Although chest pressure and pain are the most commonly reported heart attack symptoms, women can have a heart attack without experiencing them at all.

Some heart attack symptoms that are unique to women include:

  • Lower back pain
  • Abdominal pain
  • Jaw pain
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Fatigue
  • Fainting

If you notice any of the aforementioned symptoms, you should seek medical attention as soon as possible as a heart attack is a medical emergency. Even if you’re unsure if you’re having a heart attack, you should either call 911 or head to the emergency room as soon as possible.

CCH is open, safe and ready to see you.

With almost 80 physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners in nearly 20 specialties, CCH is committed to your wellbeing right here at home. If you have been putting off a visit to your doctor for a regular checkup, contact them; they can help weigh your personal healthcare risk and avoid further delayed diagnoses.

Visit www.cchwyo.org/findadoc to find your provider or clinic.