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What Men Need to Know About Prostate Cancer

What Men Need to Know About Prostate Cancer

Understanding Prostate Cancer

1 in 7 men will develop prostate cancer at some point in their lifetime. With such shockingly high statistics, it is important for men to arm themselves with the right information about this male-specific form of cancer.

What is Prostate Cancer?

Found just below the bladder and in front of the rectum, the prostate is a gland that is only found in males. This gland is responsible for producing some of the fluid that makes up semen. Prostate cancer is a chronic health condition that happens when the prostate gland starts to grow uncontrollably.

Screenings

Like most forms of cancer, early detection is key when it comes to the success of treatment for prostate cancer, making it important for men to be screened regularly. All men over the age of 50 with an average risk for developing pr cancer should have regular colorectal cancer screenings; however, if your family has a history of prostate cancer, you may want to talk with your doctor about screening in your 40s.

Prostate Specific Antigen Test

Prostate cancer can often be found early by using a simple blood test called a prostate specific antigen, or PSA. An abnormal PSA test may mean that you need additional testing.

Digital Rectal Exam (DRE)

Another test a doctor uses to look for warning signs of prostate cancer is a digital rectal exam (DRE). For this exam, the doctor inserts a gloved, lubricated finger into the rectum to feel for any bumps or abnormalities on the prostate that might be cancer.

If any abnormalities are detected during these screenings, you will likely need a biopsy or to determine whether prostate cancer is present.

Reducing Your Risk

Although you cannot eliminate your risk of developing this chronic health condition, certain lifestyle changes can help to reduce your risk significantly. These healthy lifestyle choices include:

  • Eat a low-fat diet full of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Stay physically active.
  • Don’t smoke or use tobacco products.
  • Get regular checkups with your doctor.

CCH is open, safe and ready to see you.

With almost 80 physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners in nearly 20 specialties, CCH is committed to your wellbeing right here at home. If you have been putting off a visit to your doctor for a regular checkup, contact them; they can help weigh your personal healthcare risk and avoid further delayed diagnoses.


Visit www.cchwyo.org/findadoc to find your provider or clinic

Understanding Prostate Cancer

1 in 7 men will develop prostate cancer at some point in their lifetime. With such shockingly high statistics, it is important for men to arm themselves with the right information about this male-specific form of cancer.

What is Prostate Cancer?

Found just below the bladder and in front of the rectum, the prostate is a gland that is only found in males. This gland is responsible for producing some of the fluid that makes up semen. Prostate cancer is a chronic health condition that happens when the prostate gland starts to grow uncontrollably.

Screenings

Like most forms of cancer, early detection is key when it comes to the success of treatment for prostate cancer, making it important for men to be screened regularly. All men over the age of 50 with an average risk for developing pr cancer should have regular colorectal cancer screenings; however, if your family has a history of prostate cancer, you may want to talk with your doctor about screening in your 40s.

Prostate Specific Antigen Test

Prostate cancer can often be found early by using a simple blood test called a prostate specific antigen, or PSA. An abnormal PSA test may mean that you need additional testing.

Digital Rectal Exam (DRE)

Another test a doctor uses to look for warning signs of prostate cancer is a digital rectal exam (DRE). For this exam, the doctor inserts a gloved, lubricated finger into the rectum to feel for any bumps or abnormalities on the prostate that might be cancer.

If any abnormalities are detected during these screenings, you will likely need a biopsy or to determine whether prostate cancer is present.

Reducing Your Risk

Although you cannot eliminate your risk of developing this chronic health condition, certain lifestyle changes can help to reduce your risk significantly. These healthy lifestyle choices include:

  • Eat a low-fat diet full of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Stay physically active.
  • Don’t smoke or use tobacco products.
  • Get regular checkups with your doctor.

CCH is open, safe and ready to see you.

With almost 80 physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners in nearly 20 specialties, CCH is committed to your wellbeing right here at home. If you have been putting off a visit to your doctor for a regular checkup, contact them; they can help weigh your personal healthcare risk and avoid further delayed diagnoses.


Visit www.cchwyo.org/findadoc to find your provider or clinic