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Unplug from technology for your health

  • Category: Wellness
  • Posted On:
  • Written By: Rachel Wilde, PBT, CPT, MA
Unplug from technology for your health

Some of the most precious part of life are moments. Glossy photos are now a thing of the past, replaced by digital images, tucked away on USB’s and smart phones. Now, we use Instagram and Snapchat to document all the happy and even sad occasions in our lives. Even Facebook has an app that reminds us what we were doing “On This Day”.

Sure, it’s nice to re-live those electronic depictions of our lives, but wouldn’t you rather be making real memories with friends and family, rather than being captivated by your social media with “friends” you wouldn’t acknowledge on the street?

Technology of today is designed to fascinate you and really can’t give you the same sensations as real experiences such as the smells of a brand new baby or your grandfather’s cologne. A tablet won’t allow you the perception of wind running through your hair while walking your dog in a park or playing on the beach. There is no phone smart enough to make your mouth water with the taste of fresh cherries and birthday cake. A computer can’t give you the warm hug of a friend or a kiss from your child.

Use the following tips I’ve collected to help you unplug from the chains of the internet and electronic world we spend so much of our lives in, and really, truly live this adventure called life.

  1. Limit your connections. Technology is ever present in our lives, so remove temptations that keep you attached to internet. Delete apps such as Facebook or other social media that constantly send you notifications that capture your attention. Change the settings on your email or other accounts so that they aren’t sent directly to your phone. Put your phone away—out of sight, out of mind (especially in the car!)
  2. Designate NO Phone Zones. Create family limitations on times that electronics can be used. While growing up, talking and even answering the phone during dinner was unacceptable at my house. Dinner, family occasions, holidays and yes even funerals are times meant for creating memories and not for texting or snapping.
  3. Avoid screen time at bed time. Research has shown that electronic devices can disrupt sleep patterns. Avoiding the use of electronics late in the evening gives your body and brain time to unwind after a day full of digital stimulation. Look through family photo albums. Read a book with actual pages. Better yet, read a book as a family and allow everyone to use their imagination muscles.
  4. Plan activities that don’t require electricity. Go camping or hiking where there is no phone service. Play in water or walk to the park to play. Bake cookies or use cookbooks with your kids. Do crafts or make home-made play dough. Build a project in your yard. Go sledding and skating in the winter time. Leave your tablets and phones behind and make moments worth remembering.
  5. Try an electronic detox. If the idea of leaving your internet connections behind makes you uncomfortable, this may be more important than you think. One strategy to try is to remove one device (such as a phone) or app (like games or social media) at a time and don’t use it for a period of time—start with a week. You will find stepping away from your phone is rewarding as you reconnect with friends and family in person and gain fresh perspective on the treasure that is life.

For more thoughts on this subject, check out Prince Ea, a Spoken Word Artist, views in a YouTube video: Can we auto-correct Humanity?

Have Questions?

Campbell County Health Wellness works to reduce health risks and promote overall wellness among employee groups and individuals across the northeastern Wyoming region. At Wellness, you can receive daily community blood draws, lab tests, and health and wellness screenings in Gillette, Wyoming. To learn more about Wellness, please visit www.cchwyo.org/Wellness or call 307.688.8051.

This blog was written by Rachel Wilde, PBT, CPT, MA, CCH Wellness Services Technician and Phlebotomist