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Questions for the Experts: Why does my doctor want to check my A1C?

Questions for the Experts: Why does my doctor want to check my A1C?

Campbell County Health asked members of our medical staff to answer some common questions they hear from their patients.

Q: Why does my doctor want to check my A1C?

A: The A1C test is a blood screening that measures the average level of glucose in the blood over the past two-three months for people with diabetes. It can help predict the chances of complications from diabetes and be a useful tool to look at the effectiveness of current treatment.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that a reasonable A1C goal for adults (who are not pregnant) is less than 7 percent. Your healthcare provider may suggest more or less stringent A1C goals depending on your individual care plan.

You should have your A1C tested at least twice a year if you are meeting your current treatment goals. If your treatment has recently changed or you are not meeting your goals you may need to be tested more often, such as every three months.

CCH Wellness offers the A1C test as part of their daily health screening program and is conveniently located in the Energy Professional Building at 1901 Energy Court, located off Boxelder Avenue, behind Common Cents and Wendy's. They are open Monday-Friday from 6-11 am, and you don’t need an appointment or an order from a healthcare provider. Results are mailed to your home in just a few days. Call 307.688.8051 for more information, or visit www.cchwyo.org/screen.

Melissa Gorsuch, RN, practices at Campbell County Medical Group (CCMG) Diabetes Education in Gillette, Wyoming. Diabetes education makes you more aware of your diabetes, what it takes to treat it, and give you the power to better control it. Your healthcare provider can make a referral for your diabetes education. Most insurance plans and Medicare/Medicaid cover diabetes education. Check your individual plan for specifics. You can also self-refer. Self-pay plans are available. To learn more, call 307.688.3615 or visit www.cchwyo.org/diabetes.

Campbell County Health’s Diabetes Education program is nationally recognized by the American Diabetes Association.